BBC

South Africa’s Jacob Zuma denies being ‘king’ of corruption

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Media captionJacob Zuma: I have been vilified
South Africa's former President Jacob Zuma has told a judge-led inquiry that allegations of corruption against him were a “conspiracy” aimed at removing him from the political scene.
He was appearing for the first time at the inquiry, which is investigating allegations that he oversaw a web of corruption during his term in office.
His supporters cheered when he entered the building.
Mr Zuma, 77, was forced to resign as president in February 2018.
He was replaced by his then deputy Cyril Ramaphosa, who promised to tackle corruption in South Africa. Mr Ramaphosa described Mr Zuma's nine years in office as “wasted”.

Africa Live: Updates on this and other stories
Zuma, the Guptas, and the sale of South Africa
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The allegations against Mr Zuma focus on his relationship with the controversial Gupta family, which was accused of influencing cabinet appointments and winn..

South Africa’s Jacob Zuma denies being ‘king of corruption’

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionJacob Zuma: I have been vilified
South Africa's former President Jacob Zuma has told a judge-led inquiry that allegations of corruption against him were a “conspiracy” aimed at removing him from the political scene.
He was appearing for the first time at the inquiry, which is investigating allegations that he oversaw a web of corruption during his term in office.
His supporters cheered when he entered the building.
Mr Zuma, 77, was forced to resign as president in February 2018.
He was replaced by his then deputy Cyril Ramaphosa, who promised to tackle corruption in South Africa. Mr Ramaphosa described Mr Zuma's nine years in office as “wasted”.

Africa Live: Updates on this and other stories
Zuma, the Guptas, and the sale of South Africa
Who are the Guptas?
The allegations against Mr Zuma focus on his relationship with the controversial Gupta family, which was accused of influencing cabinet appointments and winn..

South Africa’s Jacob Zuma denies being ‘king of corrupt people’

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EPA

Image caption

Jacob Zuma was dogged by allegations of corruption during his nine years as president

South Africa's ex-President Jacob Zuma told a judge-led inquiry that allegations of corruption against him were a “conspiracy” aimed at removing him from the political scene.
He was appearing for the first time at the inquiry, which is investigating allegations that he oversaw a web of corruption during his term in office.
His supporters cheered when he entered building.
Mr Zuma was forced to resign as president in February 2018.
He was replaced by his then deputy Cyril Ramaphosa, who promised to tackle corruption in South Africa. Mr Ramaphosa described Mr Zuma's nine years in office as “wasted”.

Africa Live: Updates on this and other stories
Zuma, the Guptas, and the sale of South Africa
Who are the Guptas?
The allegations against Mr Zuma focus on his relationship with the controversial Gupta family, which was accused of influencing cabinet appo..

South Africa’s Jacob Zuma says corruption allegations are ‘a conspiracy’

Image copyright
EPA

Image caption

Jacob Zuma was dogged by allegations of corruption during his nine years as president

South Africa's ex-President Jacob Zuma told a judge-led inquiry that allegations of corruption against him were a “conspiracy” aimed at removing him from the political scene.
He was appearing for the first time at the inquiry, which is investigating allegations that he oversaw a web of corruption during his term in office.
His supporters cheered when he entered building.
Mr Zuma was forced to resign as president in February 2018.
He was replaced by his then deputy Cyril Rampahosa, who promised to tackle corruption in South Africa. Mr Rampahosa described Mr Zuma's nine years in office as “wasted”.

Africa Live: Updates on this and other stories
Zuma, the Guptas, and the sale of South Africa
Who are the Guptas?
The allegations against Mr Zuma focus on his relationship with the controversial Gupta family, which was accused of influencing cabinet appo..

Ebola in DR Congo: Case confirmed in Goma

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Reuters

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The Ebola virus has spread to the city of Goma which has a population of more than a million people

The Democratic Republic of Congo has confirmed the first case of Ebola in the eastern city of Goma, home to more than a million people.
The health ministry confirmed that a pastor tested positive for the virus in a centre in Goma after arriving there by bus on Sunday.
The ministry says that risk of the disease spreading is low.
More than 1,600 people have died since the Ebola outbreak began in eastern DR Congo a year ago.

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The pastor travelled 200 km (125 miles) to Goma by bus from Butembo, where he had been with people with Ebola.

The health ministry said in a statement: “Due to the speed with which the patient has been identified and isolated, as well as the identification of all passengers from Butembo, the risk of..

State capture: Zuma, the Guptas, and the sale of South Africa

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Getty Images

South Africa's former President, Jacob Zuma, is due to give evidence this week at a commission set up to investigate “state capture” during his time in office.
The term “state capture” has become a buzzword – shorthand for the multiple scandals that plagued the Zuma administration and eventually brought it down.
What is state capture?State capture describes a form of corruption in which businesses and politicians conspire to influence a country's decision-making process to advance their own interests. As most democracies have laws to make sure this does not happen, state capture also involves weakening those laws, and neutralising any agencies that enforce them.

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AFP

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Jacob Zuma says his hands are clean

“State capture is not just about biasing public policy so that it systematically favours some corporations over others,” Abby Innes, assistant professor of political economy at the London School of Economics..