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Coronavirus: Tunisia deploys police robot on lockdown patrol

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EPA

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The robot questions people it sees out on the streets

A police robot has been deployed to patrol areas of Tunisia's capital, Tunis, to ensure that people are observing a coronavirus lockdown.
If it spies anyone walking in the largely deserted streets, it approaches them and asks why they are out.
They must then show their ID and other papers to the robot's camera, so officers controlling it can check them.
This is the second week of a nationwide lockdown to contain the virus, which has killed 14 people.

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Everyone must stay in their homes, but people are allowed out for medical reasons or to purchase necessities.

The North African nation currently has 436 people being treated for Covid-19, the respiratory illness caused by coronavirus.
How does the robot work?It is not clear how many of the Tunisian..

Coronavirus: France racism row over doctors’ Africa testing comments

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Gallo Images

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So far, Africa has been the continent least affected by the virus, but cases are increasing

Two French doctors have been accused of racism after calling for coronavirus vaccines to be trialed in Africa.
Jean-Paul Mira, head of intensive care at Cochin hospital in Paris, and Camille Locht, head of research at the Inserm health research group, both said on French TV that there was a case for testing out the vaccines in African countries.
The pair faced a swift backlash online, with many saying the comments were racist.
But Inserm have argued that the doctors were misunderstood.
What did the doctors say?“If I can be provocative, shouldn't we be doing this study in Africa, where there are no masks, no treatments, no resuscitation?” Dr Mira said on TV channel LCI.

“A bit like as it is done elsewhere for some studies on Aids. In prostitutes, we try things because we know that they are highly exposed and that they do not protect themse..

South Africa’s ruthlessly efficient fight against coronavirus

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Gallo Images

One week into South Africa's nationwide lockdown to prevent the spread of coronavirus, and it is tempting – dangerously tempting – to breathe a sigh of relief.
After all, look at how much has already been achieved. More than 47,000 people have been tested, and 67 mobile testing units have been organised.
There are even drive-through testing centres. Soon the country will be able to test 30,000 people every day. To date, only five deaths from the virus have been confirmed. About 1,400 have tested positive for Covid-19.
'Formidable leadership'South Africa seems to have acted faster, more efficiently, and more ruthlessly than many other countries around the world.

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Gallo Images

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Security officers have been accused of brutally enforcing the lockdown

Heading the fight here against Covid-19, President Cyril Ramaphosa has emerged as a formidable leader – composed, compassionate, but seized by the urgency of ..

Coronavirus: Where will be the last place to catch Covid-19?

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AFP

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Parishioners washing their hands as a preventative measure in Malawi's capital, Lilongwe

On 12 January – less than three months ago – the coronavirus was confined to China. Not a single case had been found outside the country where it emerged.
And then, on 13 January, the virus became a global problem. A case was recorded in Thailand before Japan, South Korea and the United States soon followed.
Across the world, a trickle of cases became a flood.
There have now been almost a million Covid-19 cases worldwide, in countries from Nepal to Nicaragua. But as the death tolls rise, and the hospitals overflow, is anywhere still coronavirus-free?
The answer, perhaps surprisingly, is yes.

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In North Korea, no reported cases and more missile tests

There are 193 countries which are members of the United Nations.
As of 2 April, 19 countries had not reported a Covid-19 case, according to a BBC tally using data f..

Three human-like species lived side-by-side in ancient Africa

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Science

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The remains recovered from the cave complex include the earliest example of Homo erectus – a direct human ancestor

Two million years ago, three different human-like species were living side-by-side in South Africa, a study shows.
The findings underline a growing understanding that the present-day situation, where one human species dominates the globe, may be unusual compared with the evolutionary past.
The new evidence comes from efforts to date bones uncovered at a cave complex near Johannesburg.
The research has been published in the journal Science.
The new work also revealed the earliest known example of Homo erectus, a species thought to be a direct ancestor of modern humans (Homo sapiens).

The three groups of hominins (human-like creatures) belonged to Australopithecus (the group made famous by the “Lucy” fossil from Ethiopia), Paranthropus and Homo – better known as humans.
Andy Herries, from LaTrobe University in Melbourne, Australi..